Take Full Responsibility

 Concern yourself more with accepting responsibility than with assigning blame. Let the possibilities inspire you more than the obstacles discourage you.
– Ralph Marston

Daily Devotional

Exodus 4:10 And Moses said unto the Lord, O my Lord, I am not eloquent, neither heretofore, nor since thou hast spoken unto thy servant: but I am slow of speech, and of a slow tongue.

During the years when professional basketball was just beginning to become really popular, Bill Russell, who played center for the Boston Celtics, was one of the greatest players in the pro league. He was especially known for his rebounding and his defensive skills.

But like a lot of very tall centers, Russell was never much of a free throw shooter. His free throw percentage was quite a bit below average in fact. But this low percentage didn’t really give a clear picture of Russell’s ability as an athlete. And in one game he gave a very convincing demonstration of this.

It was the final game of a championship series between Boston and the Los Angeles Lakers. With about twelve seconds left to play, the Lakers were behind by one point and Boston had the ball. It was obvious that the Lakers would have to foul one of Boston’s players in order to get the ball back, and they chose to foul Bill Russell.

This was a perfectly logical choice since statistically Russell was the worst free throw shooter on the court at that moment. If he missed the shot, the Lakers would probably get the ball back and they’d still have enough time to try to win the game. But if Russell made his first free throw, the Lakers’ chances would be seriously diminished. And if he made both shots, the game would essentially be over.

Bill Russell had a very peculiar style of shooting free throws. Today, no self-respecting basketball player anywhere in America would attempt it. Aside from the question of whether it’s an effective way to shoot a basket, it just looked too ridiculous. Whenever he had to shoot a free throw, the six-foot-eleven Russell would start off holding the ball in both hands about waist high, then he’d squat down and as he straightened up he’d let go of the ball. It looked like he was trying to throw a bucket of dirt over a wall.

But regardless of how he looked, as soon as Bill Russell was fouled, he knew the Celtics were going to win the game. He was absolutely certain of it because, in a situation like this, statistics and percentages mean nothing. There was a much more important factor at work, something that no one has found a way to express in numbers and decimal points.

Simply put, Bill Russell was a player who wanted to take responsibility for the success or failure of his team. He wanted the weight on his shoulders in a situation like this. No possibility for excuses. No possibility of blaming anyone else if the game was lost. No second guessing. Bill Russell wanted the ball in his  hands and nobody else’s. And, like magic, even if he’d missed every free throw he’d ever shot in his life before this, he knew he was going to make this one. And that is exactly what happened.

That is what virtually always happens when a man or woman accepts responsibility eagerly and with confidence. I’ve always felt that accepting responsibility is one of the highest forms of human maturity. A willingness to be accountable, to put yourself on the line, is really the defining characteristic of adulthood.

In the scripture, Moses highlighted his limitations to God, who in turn ensured that his purpose was fulfilled even if it meant using someone else who could speak with eloquence. Do not accept unwanted outcomes; exercise your power to create change in your environment by accepting full responsibility. Even though there may be legitimate excuses as to why you may not get to your desired outcome, refuse to accept any excuses from yourself. If you do so, you could easily talk yourself into believing a lie that you can’t do something that you could have easily done. A better approach is to take responsibility for the outcome and then look at ways that you can get better. That way of thinking, helps to continually improve and pushes you closer to your desired outcome. 

Not until you take full responsibility will you realize that you can do something about your unwanted circumstance. If you blame others you are giving them the power to create the change you want. It is unlikely that they will deliver.   

Life Application: Own the outcome and continually look at ways to get better.

Dear Lord, it is so easy to blame others for things that I am refusing to take responsibility for. But, I recognize that that shows my immaturity more than anything else. Help me to accept responsibility for my actions and make the necessary changes that I have to make. In Jesus name, amen.

Published by Stacyan Rowe

I am an avid reader who enjoys exploring the world through words. I am a Christian, wife and mother to two amazing boys. I am an English teacher at the secondary level. I love writing and having meaningful discussions.

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